Friendship Quotes

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One friend in a life-time is much; two are many; three are hardly possible. Friendship needs a certain parallelism of life, a community of thought, a rivalry of aim.
Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918) – The Education of Henry Adams, Ch. 20, 1907

The greatest sweetener of human life is friendship. To raise this to the highest pitch of enjoyment, is a secret which but few discover.
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – Quoted in Hugs for Girlfriends by Philis Boultinghouse and LeAnn Weiss p7, but there appears to be no published sources for this statement prior to 2001.

True happiness is of a retired nature, and an enemy to pomp and noise; it arises, in the first place, from the enjoyment of one’s self, and, in the next, from the friendship and conversation of a few select companions.
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – The Spectator (1711-12), No. 15, March 17, 1711.

Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn;
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – “The Campaign,” 1704, line 102.

One friend in a life-time is much; two are many; three are hardly possible. Friendship needs a certain parallelism of life, a community of thought, a rivalry of aim.
Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918) – The Education of Henry Adams, Ch. 20, 1907

The greatest sweetener of human life is friendship. To raise this to the highest pitch of enjoyment, is a secret which but few discover.
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – Quoted in Hugs for Girlfriends by Philis Boultinghouse and LeAnn Weiss p7, but there appears to be no published sources for this statement prior to 2001.

True happiness is of a retired nature, and an enemy to pomp and noise; it arises, in the first place, from the enjoyment of one’s self, and, in the next, from the friendship and conversation of a few select companions.
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – The Spectator (1711-12), No. 15, March 17, 1711.

Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn;
Joseph Addison (1672-1719) – “The Campaign,” 1704, line 102.

Our friends interpret the world and ourselves to us, if we take them tenderly and truly, nor need we but love them devotedly to become members of an immortal fraternity, superior to accident or change.
A. Bronson Alcott (1799-1888) – Table-Talk, Roberts Brothers, Boston, 1877, p. 77.

People will forget what you said
People will forget what you did
But people will never forget how you made them feel.
Maya Angelou – Conversations with Maya Angelou (1989) by Jeffrey M. Elliot

There are only two people who can tell you the truth about yourself – an enemy who has lost his temper and a friend who loves you dearly.
Antisthenes (445BC – 365BC) – Quoted in The Book of Ancient Wisdom, ed. Bill Bradfield, 2005

Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold thread. Both contribute to make the picture beautiful and unique.
Anon

Friendship is a plant which must be often watered.
Anon

When friendships are real, they are not glass threads, or frost work, but the solidest things we know. A friend is the first person who come in when the whole world has gone out.
Anonymous

A new friend is like new wine; when it has aged you will drink it with pleasure.
Apocrypha: Ecclesiasticus 9:10

Friendship is the source of the greatest pleasures, and without friends even the most agreeable pursuits become tedious.
Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) Quoted in Dictionary of Foreign Quotations, Collison, MacMillan Press, 1980, p. 132.

Man’s best friend is one who wishes well to the object of his wish for his sake, even if no one is to know of it.
Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) – Nicomachean Ethics Book IX Chapter 8, 325 B.C.

Between friends there is no need of justice.
Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) – Nicomachean Ethics (4th c. B.C.) 8.I, tr. Thompson

Friendship is a single soul dwelling in two bodies.
Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) – Quoted in Diogenes Laeritus’s Lives and Opinions of eminent Philosophers (3rd C. A.D.) tr. R.D. Hicks

Misfortune shows those who are not really friends.
Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) – Eudemian Ethics VII 1238a20

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.
Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) – Eudemian Ethics Book VIII, 1155.a5

There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves; it is not my nature.
Jane Austen (1775-1817) – Northanger Abby, 1817-1819, Wild Jolt Press, 2009, p 22.

Much certainly of the happiness and purity of our lives depends on our making a wise choice of our companions and friends. If our friends are badly chosen they will inevitably drag us down; if well they will raise us up.
Lord Avebury (John Lubbock) {1834-1913) – Pleasures of the Life, “The Blessings of Friends,” MacMillan And Co, London, 1913, p. 57

Your friends will know you better in the first minute you meet than your acquaintances will know you in a thousand years.
Richard Bach (1936 -) Illusions, The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, 1977, p49.

The best preservative to keep the mind in health is the faithful admonition of a friend.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays (1625) XXVII “Of Friendship”

But we may go further, and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends; without which the world is but a wilderness.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays (1625) XXVII “Of Friendship”

For a crowd is not company; and faces are but a gallery of pictures; and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays (1625) XXVII “Of Friendship”

A principal fruit of friendship, is the ease and discharge of the fullness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays (1625) XXVII “Of Friendship”

Friendship maketh daylight in the understanding, out of darkness and confusion of thoughts.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays (1625) XXVII “Of Friendship”

If a man be gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows he is a citizen of the world, and that his heart is no island cut off from others lands, but a continent that joins to them.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – Essays, “Of Goodness, and Goodness of Nature,” (1597-1625)

Little minds need to practice despotism to relieve their nerves, just as great souls thirst for equality in friendship to exercise their hearts.
Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850) – Pierrette (1840), translated by Katharine Prescott Wormeley, Ch. IV: Pierrette.

The friendship between me and you I will not compare to a chain; for that the rains might rust, or the falling tree might break. We are the same as if one man’s body were to be divided into two parts; we are all one flesh and blood.
George Bancroft (1800-1891)-  Quoted in: Punch, Vol XII, London, 1847, “Penn Punch & The Smithfield Savages, p.  168.

 

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